Lolong's remains moved in the National Museum of Natural History

Lolong's remains moved in the National Museum of Natural History

The National Museum of Natural History welcomed Lolong, the largest crocodile in captivity.

The 6.17m and 1,075kg saltwater crocodile who was captured in a Bunawan creek in the province of Agusan del Sur in Mindanao last September 3, 2011 and died on February 10, 2013 has his new home as the National Museum moved his stuffed remains.

lolong

Lolong (Photo from CBS News)

The National Museum of the Philippines shared details on Facebook and wrote:

"The NM moves Lolong to the National Museum of Natural History.

Everyday we get to do cool stuff at the National Museum but some days are cooler than others. Here is a photo of the stuffed Lolong being moved from the Taxidermy Visible Storage at the National Museum of Anthropology to his new and permanent home at our forthcoming Natural History Museum. The move was facilitated by the Zoology Division staff and it took about 18 men to carry him. He is now being prepared for exhibition to create awareness for Philippine wildlife and make us understand more about marshland ecology.

lolong

Photo from National Museum of the Philippines Facebook page

Lolong died 10 February 2013 and was the largest crocodile in captivity. He was an Indo-Pacific or saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) that measured at 6.17 m and weighed 1,075 kg, making him one of the largest crocodiles ever measured and in captivity from snout-to-tail. Lolong was caught in a Bunawan creek in the province of Agusan del Sur in Mindanao on 3 September 2011. He was the centerpiece of Bunawan Ecopark and Wildlife Reservation Center in Barangay Consuelo near the township until his death in 2013."

lolong

Photo from National Museum of the Philippines Facebook page

Don't forget to subscribe to KAMI YouTube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3m6QZbXFp6VEZFlfBj43rw

Source: Kami.com.ph

Related news
Jennica Garcia shares how Baby Mori play with stones that change from being 'ulam' to 'langgam'

Jennica Garcia shares how Baby Mori play with stones that change from being 'ulam' to 'langgam'

Jennica Garcia shares how Baby Mori play with stones that change from being 'ulam' to 'langgam'
KAMI.com.ph
Mailfire view pixel