Scientists, pinag-aaralan ang mga unggoy upang maka-develop ng COVID-19 vaccine

Scientists, pinag-aaralan ang mga unggoy upang maka-develop ng COVID-19 vaccine

- Researchers in Louisiana recently entered a new phase in their quest to develop a vaccine for coronavirus disease when they infected monkeys with the virus

- They infected four monkeys, two rhesus macaques and two African green monkeys "to answer their questions"

- They plan on analyzing the animals with X-rays and taking blood, fluid and, eventually, tissue samples in an effort to see how the virus works inside their bodies

- Once they find out that the disease looks the same with them, they plan to use the monkeys to test vaccines or develop treatments

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Scientists in Louisiana recently entered a new phase in their search to develop a vaccine for coronavirus disease when they infected monkeys with the virus.

In a report by ABC News, Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC) researchers infected four monkeys, two rhesus macaques and two African green monkeys, with coronavirus. Then, every few days moving forward, they plan on analyzing the animals with X-rays and taking blood, fluid and, eventually, tissue samples in an effort to see how the virus works inside their bodies.

According to Dr. Rudolph "Skip" Bohm, the associate director of the TNPRC, they decided to infect four monkeys via a statistical model that determined that was how many they would need "to answer the questions we needed" while also using the fewest number of animals possible.

"Once we show that the disease looks the same — so the same percentage of animals get sick as in the human population, they have the same sort of illness and the same sort of symptoms as humans — then we can use them to test vaccines or develop treatments," ABC News quoted Dr. Bohm.

Scientists, pinag-aaralan ang mga unggoy upang naka-develop ng COVID-19 vaccine

Scientists study novel coronavirus in monkeys in hopes of finding a vaccine. (Photo courtesy of Tulane National Primate Research Center)
Source: Twitter

"The thing is, though, that in order to win this battle against the COVID pandemic, the research we’re doing is essential. So what we know is that if we push and we’re busy, it’s the only way we’re going to find therapies or vaccines that are going to save thousands of lives worldwide,” Dr. Bohm said.

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KAMI previously reported that a post of a netizen about a vaccine for the coronavirus which recently gone viral is a false claim.

Tulane National Primate Research Center is home to about 4,500 monkeys, some of which are now being used to study the new coronavirus in hopes of developing a vaccine.

At the TNPRC, scientists from across the United States are coordinating their research in nonhuman primates, like rhesus macaques, to develop diagnostics, treatments, and vaccines for the novel coronavirus, according to ABC News.

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Source: Kami.com.ph

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